exhibitions

Autumn Exhibition

In Commemoration of New Additions to Collection: Companionship among Sukisha in Modern Times - Masuda Don’o, Yokoi Yau and Hatakeyama Sokuo
7th October – 17th December

The exhibition highlights the interactions among three tea masters in the modern era, namely: Masuda Don’o (born Masuda Takashi, 1848-1938), a business-person, leader of the early-modern Japanese economic community and one of the foremost collectors of Japanese art; Yokoi Yau (born Yokoi Hanzaburo, 1883-1945), a tea friend of Don’o; and Hatakeyama Sokuo. This exhibit goes beyond merely showcasing their old collections, custom-designed goods and self-produced calligraphic works, paintings and tea utensils; by featuring numerous letters left by these tea masters, it elucidates the way of life of sukisha in modern times. Since this year coincidentally marks the 80th anniversary of the passing of Masuda Don’o, the exhibit will feature items especially associated with him. Please don't miss this golden opportunity.


新収蔵記念 近代数寄者の交遊録―益田鈍翁・横井夜雨・畠山即翁

Holiday

Mondays
(except National Holidays; instead, close the following day), 10th November

Opening hours

10:00-17:00 (April - September)
10:00-16:30 (October - March)

Last entry is 30 minutes before closing time

Admission fees

Adult 700yen (600yen) Student 500yen (400yen) 
*Students with adults of elementary school and junior high school are free
*( ) reduced fees are available for groups of over twenty people)

Japanese Green Tea
(Maccha) service

500 yen
( We serve at the exhibition room, please buy a tea ticket at the front desk )

Masterpieces of Chanoyu― Beauty beyond the model, The eyes of Sokuo
8th April-18th June

Selected from the tea utensil collection of Hatakeyama Sokuo (1881-1971), the founder of this museum, the spring-term exhibition introduces indisputably excellent craftworks and also showcases a number of pieces of Momoyama tea pottery characterized by their unconventional forms. In addition, we will reproduce combinations of tea utensils that Sokuo presented at this museum in the past. We encourage you to take this opportunity to think about present-day chanoyu through the great craftworks loved by Sokuo, the last sukisha of the modern era. For this term, we have also scheduled a special exhibition of an Important Cultural Property of Japan entitled Chikurin Shichikenzu Byobu, which draws on the theme of the Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove and was painted by Sesson Shukei on a pair of folding screens.


 




Introduction to ChanoyuⅡ
5th August-18th September

This exhibition, composed of chanoyu-related keywords including tokonoma, chashitsu, koicha and toriawase, aims to point out key features when viewing and appreciating the utensils used in the Japanese tea ceremony. As the sequel to the "Introduction to Chanoyu" that won favorable recognition last summer, this exhibition will present new keywords to introduce the fascinating world of chanoyu. There is no need to worry that the world of chanoyu is rigidly formal and difficult to enjoy. We promise that you will be genuinely amazed and impressed by everything you see at the exhibition.


 




In Commemoration of New Additions to Collection: Companionship among Sukisha in Modern Times - Masuda Don’o, Yokoi Yau and Hatakeyama Sokuo
7th October-17th December

The exhibition highlights the interactions among three tea masters in the modern era, namely: Masuda Don’o (born Masuda Takashi, 1848-1938), a business-person, leader of the early-modern Japanese economic community and one of the foremost collectors of Japanese art; Yokoi Yau (born Yokoi Hanzaburo, 1883-1945), a tea friend of Don’o; and Hatakeyama Sokuo. This exhibit goes beyond merely showcasing their old collections, custom-designed goods and self-produced calligraphic works, paintings and tea utensils; by featuring numerous letters left by these tea masters, it elucidates the way of life of sukisha in modern times. Since this year coincidentally marks the 80th anniversary of the passing of Masuda Don’o, the exhibit will feature items especially associated with him. Please don't miss this golden opportunity.


 




Plates and Vessels for Chakaiseki (Concurrent Exhibition: Seasonal Calligraphic Works and Paintings)
20th January, 2018-18th March

Chakaiseki is the meal served to the guests of a formal tea ceremony (chaji). The plates and vessels used for chakaiseki are collectively called kaiseki-dogu, composed of zen and bon on which dishes are placed, wan, hachi and mukozuke that receive food, drinking vessels for sake and so on. While lacquerware was mainly used for chakaiseki in earlier times, ceramics and porcelain also became popular after the Edo period. Assuming the role of complementing the food served on them, they eventually became the subject of appreciation as well. We hope you will enjoy both the fineness of individual pieces, and also the charm produced by the combination of the "plates and vessels of hospitality," that adds a glamorous air to the scene.